Plano, TX

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Plano is located mostly within Collin County. The city’s population was 269,776 at the2010 census, making it the ninth most populous city in the state of Texas (Corpus Christi is ranked at #8 and Laredo is ranked at #10) and the 70th most populous city in the United States. Plano is located within the metropolitan area commonly referred to as the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The city is home to many corporate headquarters: Alliance Data, Cinemark Theatres, Dell Services, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Ericsson, Frito-Lay, HP Enterprise Services, Huawei, J. C. Penney, Pizza Hut, Rent-A-Center, Traxxas, and Siemens PLM Software.

The tracks and adjacent platforms at the Parker Road DART station in Plano, Texas

In 2005, Plano was designated the best place to live in the Western United States by CNN Money magazine. In 2006, Plano was selected as the 11th best place to live in the United States by CNN Money magazine.[5] Plano schools consistently score among the highest in the nation. It has been rated as the wealthiest city in the United States by CNN Money with a poverty rate of less than 6.4%. In 2008, Forbes.com selected Plano, University Park, and Highland Park as the three “Top Suburbs To Live Well” of Dallas. The United States Census Bureau declared Plano the wealthiest city of 2008 by comparing the median household income for all U.S. cities whose populations were greater than 250,000. The annual Plano Balloon Festival and the Plano International Festival are two of the city’s premiere cultural and entertainment events. In October 2010, Forbes magazine named Plano the safest city to live in America with a population greater than 250,000.

 

History

Settlers came to the area near present-day Plano in the early 1840s. Facilities such as a sawmill, a gristmill, and a store soon brought more people to the area. Mail service was established, and after rejecting several names for the budding town (including naming it in honor of then-President Millard Fillmore), the locals suggested the namePlano (from the Spanish word for “flat”), a reference to the local terrain. The name was accepted by the post office. In 1872, the completion of the Houston and Central Texas Railway helped the city grow, and the city was officially incorporated in 1873. The population grew to more than 500 by 1874. In 1881, a fire raged through the central business district, destroying most of the buildings. The town was rebuilt and business again flourished through the 1880s. Also in 1881, the city assumed responsibility for what will eventually become Plano Independent School District (PISD), ending the days of Plano being served only by private schools.

The population of Plano initially grew slowly, reaching 1,304 in 1900 and increasing to 3,695 in 1960. By 1970, Plano began to feel some of the boom its neighbors had experienced following World War II. A series ofpublic works projects and a change in taxes that removed the farming community from the town helped increase the overall population of Plano. In 1970, the population reached 17,872, and by 1980, the population had exploded to 72,000. Sewers, schools and street development kept pace with this massive increase, largely due to Plano’s flat topography, grid layout and planning initiatives.

In 1981 the Plano City Council adopted the City’s official logo based on a design submitted via a community contest by long-time Plano resident James R. (Jim) Wainner, a professional artist and graphic designer. City of Plano Code of Ordinances, Chapter 2, Article I, Section 2-1 (b) states that no person, firm, organization, or corporation other than the city shall adopt, use, display, incorporate, or appropriate the official logo of the city as any part of any material, equipment, or other matter of such person, firm, organization or corporation, without written application to and approval of the city council.

During the 1980s, many large corporations moved their headquarters to Plano, including J. C. Penney and Frito-Lay, which helped the city grow. By 1990, the population reached 128,713, dwarfing the county seat of McKinney. In 1994, the city was recognized as an All-America City. By 2000, the population grew to 222,030, making it one of the largest suburbs of Dallas. Plano is completely locked in by other municipalities and cannot expand in area, and there is little undeveloped land remaining within the city limits. However, one large tract of land is being developed as of July 2012. Turnpike Commons at the intersection of Renner Rd and the George Bush Turnpike (bordered also by Shiloh Rd to the east). The development will feature apartments, medical facilities, restaurants, a Race Trac gas station, and a hotel.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Plano has a total area of 71.6 square miles (185.5 km2).
Although Plano is named for the flat plains of the area, large trees abound in the city’s many parks (Plano’s map of big trees). One such tree, estimated to be over 500 years old, resides in Bob Woodruff park near Rowlett Creek on the city’s east side (Plano’s Quincentennial Bur Oak).

Climate

Plano is considered to be in the humid subtropical climate zone. The highest recorded temperature was 118°F (48°C) in 1936. On average, the coolest month is January and the warmest month is July. The lowest recorded temperature was -7°F (-22°C) in 1930. The maximum average precipitation occurs in May.

[schoolsearch city=”Plano” state=”TX” groupby=”gradelevel” output=”table”]

Plano median sales prices

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